Hot Cross Buns

Hot Cross Buns

In 14th century, England, they were peddled through the streets to the old jingle “one a penny, two a penny, Hot Cross Buns”. Tradition has it that if two people share a hot cross bun, they will know true fellowship. Since hot cross buns were thought to have magical powers, sailors used to wear them around there necks as a protection against disease or shipwreck.

The above taken from: Out of Old Nova Scotia Kitchens by Marie Nightingale

Hot Cross Buns

Hot Cross Buns.  (Viola Crowell)

1/2 cup water
1 tsp. sugar
1 Tbsp. dry yeast
1 cup milk
1 Tbsp. sugar
3&1/2 cup flour
1/4 cup margarine or butter
1 egg
1/2 cup sugar
1&1/2 tsp. cinnamon
1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 cup currants

Scald the milk and add the butter, sugar and salt. Cool to lukewarm. Add the yeast ( which has been dissolved in the 1/2 cup water and 1 tsp. sugar). Add half the flour and the cinnamon. Beat thoroughly. Add the egg. Stir in currants. Add rest of flour, to make dough just firm enough to handle and not stick to fingers. Toss on a lightly floured board and knead to smoothness. Shape into buns and pace in pan one inch apart. Cover with a cloth and let rise until double in size. Brush the tops with a beaten egg and bake in 375-400 degree oven for 15-20 minutes. Ice with a cross of frosting while warm.

Never-Fail Biscuits

Never-Fail Biscuits.  (Mrs. Morton Smith)

4 cups flour
2/3 cup shortening
1 tsp. salt
8 tsp. baking powder
2 Tbsp. Sugar
1&3/4 cup plus 1 Tbsp. Milk

Cut shortening into flour, salt, baking powder and sugar. Add milk gradually. Knead on floured board to make smooth. Do not knead too much flour into dough. Roll and cut out. Bake 15 minutes in hot oven.

Steamed Brown Bread

Steamed Brown Bread.   (Ruth Kendrick)

2 cups flour
2 tsp. soda, sifted with flour
1 cup cornmeal
1 tsp. salt
1 cup molasses
2&1/2 cup cold water

Measure and mix the dry ingredients. Add molasses which has been mixed well with 1 cup cold water. Lastly stir in remaining 1&1/2 cup water and mix well. Pour into greased mold and steam for 3 hours.

Cakes

Cakes

Eggs, in great numbers were used with much beating to try to obtain a light cake. A recipe for a wedding cake called for 12 dozen eggs and the batter was mixed in a wash tub.

Several women must have taken part in beating a cake of that size, for hours of beating was necessary before the advent of baking powder.

Measurements were vague. Most old-time cooks knew by instinct when to “hurtle in a good quantity of raisins” or just how much “a few blops of molasses” meant.

The above taken from: Out of Old Nova Scotia Kitchens by Marie Nightingale

War Cake

War Cake (Mabel Banks)

2 cups white sugar
2 cups cold water
2 cups raisins
1 tsp. cloves
1 tsp. cinnamon
1 tsp. salt
4 Tbsp. shortening
2 tsp. soda
1/2 cup cold water
3 cups flour

Boil together for 10-15 minutes sugar, water, raisins, spices, salt and shortening. Cool, then add soda which has been dissolved in 1/2 cup cold water; mix well. Add sifted flour and stir thoroughly until blended. Bake in loaf pan or tube pan in moderate oven one hour or until done.

Drop Doughnuts

Drop Doughnuts  (Mildred Shand)

3&1/2 cups flour
3 tsp. baking powder
1 tsp. salt
2 eggs
3 Tbsp.shortening
1 cup sugar
1 cup milk
1 tsp. vanilla

Sift together flour, baking powder and salt in large bowl. Beat eggs well. Beat in shortening and sugar, milk and the vanilla. Add to flour mixture all at once. Beat just until the mixture is smooth. Dip spoon in hot fat and then drop off batter into hot fat. Turn the puffs as soon as they come to the top. Fry only 3 or 4 at a time.

Puddings

Puddings

Old time puddings were boiled, steamed, or baked, and we’re not always intended as the dessert, but often preceded the main course. All kinds of berries and fruits were used in the batter and the puddings were served up with a variety of delicious sauces.
A type of dumpling that has long been popular in Nova Scotia is called “Grunt”. The odd name is said to have come from the noises made by the fruit as it stewed in the pot. Blueberry Grunt is the best known, but strawberries, raspberries, rhubarb and apples were also used. In many homes Grunts were not considered to be desserts but were dished up in large portions as the main course.

The above taken from: Out of Old Nova Scotia Kitchens by Marie Nightingale

Cottage Pudding

Cottage Pudding   (Gladys Banks)

1 cup sugar
1/2 cup margarine
1 egg
1 cup milk
2 cups flour
1 tsp. soda
2 tsp. cream of tartar
1/4 tsp. salt
1 tsp. vanilla

Cream margarine and sugar. Add egg and beat well. Add sifted dry ingredients alternately with milk, add vanilla. Bake in a moderate oven until done. Serve with chocolate sauce.

Chocolate Sauce

1 cup white sugar
2 Tbsp. cornstarch
1/2 tsp. salt
Piece of butter
2 Tbsp. cocoa
2 cups hot water
1 tsp. vanilla

Boil the sauce ingredients together until thickened.